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Author Topic: Wiring in a Power Cord  (Read 8055 times)
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Pixel
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« on: September 04, 2013, 12:12:48 AM »

I hope it's okay if I ask this here. Is the procedure for wiring a new power cord the same for Cavalier and Vendo square tops, or is it machine-specific? Do I need any special terminals on the wire ends? I searched the forum, but couldn't find an answer.
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MoonDawg
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2013, 08:18:18 AM »

       A power cord comes with a new wiring harness. The harness may vary in different machines but replacement is always the same.
You only need to buy a few ring terminals, the rest is pretty straight forward.
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Glen
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2013, 11:25:17 AM »

In the factory wiring setup, is the power cord made into the wiring harness, or is there there a set of terminals on a block that the individual wires connect to?
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wee
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2013, 11:30:36 AM »

Maybe this post on my blog will help....This was on a Vendo 80  not sure if it's that same or not.

http://vendo80.blogspot.com/2012/09/started-working-on-wiring.html

Brian
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Pixel
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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2013, 11:52:49 AM »

I bet that's gonna be pretty close. A lot of these things seem to have been more or less standardized fairly quickly. If I wanted either a quick fix or a test setup, would there be anything wrong with just wiring a decent computer power cable (those fairly thick round ones the three rectangular holes on the female end) into that block?
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Pixel
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« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2013, 02:19:34 PM »

         Power cords get dragged when moving and get damaged.

         This later style Cavalier actually uses an extension cord as it's main power cord.  Good thinking there, easy to change.

I brought this quote over because it occurs to me that if I were re-wiring an older machine anyway, I could do the same thing by cutting a properly rated outdoor extension cord in two near the male end, and wire the male end into the junction block. I know I'm not the first person to think of this, but I wanted to know-is there any reason this idea would be any more dangerous or undesirable than wiring in a complete cord?
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stuntpilot
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« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2013, 04:05:08 AM »

There's no problem using an properly rated outdoor extension cord for a power cord, just buy the correct connectors to terminate the ends, these will probably be eye terminals. You will also need to buy a crimper.

I would use type SO rubber cord, it will last a lot longer. You can buy new 6 or 9 foot cords at any large box store or build your own.

You could put a computer block in there but I wouldn't, you want to have a more solid connection for the in-rush current that you have with a compressor.

All cords are rated and labeled, just look on the jacket and reference the ampacity chart below.


http://www.stayonline.com/reference-circuit-ampacity.aspx
« Last Edit: September 19, 2013, 04:17:44 AM by stuntpilot » Logged
Pixel
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« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2013, 06:28:04 PM »

Thank you for showing me that information. Smiley

How would I identify type SO power cord?

You advised against wiring in "a computer block". Did you mean an IEC 3-pin connector like this would plug into?

http://www.amazon.com/IEC-POWER-CORD-PLUG-CONNECTOR/dp/B002T0JMTY/ref=pd_sim_sbs_lg_2

Should I base the current rating on the labeled rating of the machine (about 7 amps on some machines)?

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stuntpilot
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« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2013, 02:49:49 AM »

SO cord can be identified by the markings on the sheathing. All cord and wire can be identified this way if it's not wore off.
Any cord in the 600 volt category will work for you, the only difference is in the type of the insulation and stranding. You just need basic 600 volt 16 guage rubber cord with a black, white and green. Home Depot or Lowes will have it on the rolls at the bulk wire rack. Don't forget the cord cap. (plug)  If your not comfortable making your own cord just buy a 6 or 9 foot pre made whip, 16 guage, these usually have a fork already crimped on the green wire.

Since your original probably isn't grounded you will need to drill and tap a ground screw to connect the green wire to the chassis of the machine somewhere.

Yes, I wouldn't put one of those in, it's not adequate for the in rush current. Your just adding a connection you don't need and it will eventually fail.

Yes, base it on the name plate rating, we usually never allow more than 80% of the cord rating.  
So as an example if your nameplate rating is 8 amps use a minimum of a 10 amp rated cord.

 
« Last Edit: September 20, 2013, 03:46:32 AM by stuntpilot » Logged
MoonDawg
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« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2013, 09:24:09 AM »

      It is not advisable to use regular power cord and add the plug to it for outdoor use, as it will not be water resistant

      Your original idea of cutting an extension cord was ok but like the Pilot said, needless extra connections.

      After installing a power cord, always clamp a section of it to the compressor base to absorb the strain of a hard pull against your connections.
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Glen
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« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2013, 11:31:11 AM »

It is not advisable to use regular power cord and add the plug to it for outdoor use, as it will not be water resistant
I doubt I ever have that many machines I would use outdoors. Too much risk of abuse and theft. I wouldn't use a add-on plug either way. I've seen them, and I don't think they're very robust, especially if I tried to put one together.  biggrin

Your original idea of cutting an extension cord was ok but like the Pilot said, needless extra connections.
I don't suppose it really adds much to a machine that is meant to remain in place for years. Wiring a stub cord with male plug would probably be the most useful if the machine is handled in ways that increase the chance of the cord being damaged. Like if it is moved around a lot, or left where rats can get at the wiring. Though a stub cord won't help much if rats chew on more than just the power cord.  darn

After installing a power cord, always clamp a section of it to the compressor base to absorb the strain of a hard pull against your connections.

If a stub cord is used, it should be long enough to have strain relief like described above, shouldn't it?
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MoonDawg
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« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2013, 12:41:17 PM »

       No stub, splice in a full 6 or 8 foot length.
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Glen
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« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2013, 05:03:04 PM »

You should already have the strain relief on the deck I hope.

Cord caps are just fine if you have the confidence to build one, and used under the proper in-use cover will be weather tight.
All outdoor receptacles should be GFI protected and employ an in-use cover, even a sealed cord without an in-use cover is trouble waiting to happen.
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kdog
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« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2018, 06:16:38 AM »

Are wiring harnesses bought from FunTronics able to be used in Australia (240V)??

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johnieG
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This is fine...everythings going to be OK....


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« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2018, 07:33:09 AM »

You need to check the maximum working voltage rating on the cord jacket, typically a 120 volt  rated cord-set is listed at 300 volts max.  Which in theory would be within limits for 240 volt power taking into account the cord plug itself is different down under of course.

The cord-sets wire gauge won’t be a problem insofar as your voltage will double but the current will halve ( as compared to U.S.A. wattage requirements )

In my industrial controls work,  the working voltage of the wiring  is at least double the applied voltage, ( example; 300 volts for 120 vokt circuits & 600 volts for 480 volts circuits, etc. )

My shop 240 volt extention cord says “ 300 volts max applied voltage “

Hope this helps...
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Yeah..220, 221 whatever it takes.
Remember, all it needs is a shot of Freon!
The Vendo V-83 is the '59 Edsel of the coke machine world. ;p
Spray painting does NOT restore a compressor
Because 11 is louder than 10...
kdog
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« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2018, 07:46:50 AM »

sorry, still confused.

Let me ask something that would negate the need for a new harness.  Would I have to remove the compressor from the machine to have it rewired?  Because if so, then I'll have to wait til the wires melt Sad
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johnieG
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« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2018, 11:41:48 AM »

Gotcha, keep it simple Simon...

In short ( no pun intended) The Funtronic’s harness will work on your machine, but you’ll have to lopp off the US male plug end & wire on an Australia type -I plug ( picture attached for others to understand).  Assuming that everything on it ie: compressor, fan motors,  coinmech are 230 volts..

& Yes, you should be able to rewire the machine as it sits no disassembly required , although some spots will be tight to get to.

The Color code of the wires willbe a little different

Black = Brown
White= Blue
Green = green/yellow ( earth)
« Last Edit: September 10, 2018, 11:53:03 AM by johnieG » Logged

Spoon-feeding Newbies since 2001...Wink
Yeah..220, 221 whatever it takes.
Remember, all it needs is a shot of Freon!
The Vendo V-83 is the '59 Edsel of the coke machine world. ;p
Spray painting does NOT restore a compressor
Because 11 is louder than 10...
kdog
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« Reply #17 on: September 10, 2018, 04:33:35 PM »

So while spec-wise is should handle 240v, has anyone tried a funtronics harness in an Australian compressor?  I assume that Aus and US compressors have same connections etc, but that is just a guess.
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johnieG
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« Reply #18 on: September 10, 2018, 05:07:33 PM »

So while spec-wise is should handle 240v, has anyone tried a funtronics harness in an Australian compressor?  I assume that Aus and US compressors have same connections etc, but that is just a guess.

Yes, they both have two wires connecting the harness to the compressor via the compressor pigtail/plug, the only difference is the operating voltage...
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Spoon-feeding Newbies since 2001...Wink
Yeah..220, 221 whatever it takes.
Remember, all it needs is a shot of Freon!
The Vendo V-83 is the '59 Edsel of the coke machine world. ;p
Spray painting does NOT restore a compressor
Because 11 is louder than 10...
sjt1803
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« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2018, 11:17:30 PM »


If your concerned if the wiring from the US will work, in theory assuming the compressor offers the same load, as the 120 version, the wiring should have to handle only 1/2 the current it was designed for. The current draw on the the other items, motors and changer are insignificant compared to the compressor.

You can also rewire the harness wire for wire with the exact wire used, from a local electrical supplier.


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kdog
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« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2018, 12:56:49 AM »

Looking at some photos of compressors in similar machines to mine on this forum, I think my compressor is directly wired to the main electrical line.  There is no 2nd plug inside the machine for the compressor, just some wires taped together with electrical tape.
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johnieG
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« Reply #21 on: September 13, 2018, 04:54:11 PM »

 It’s all good  biggrin
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Spoon-feeding Newbies since 2001...Wink
Yeah..220, 221 whatever it takes.
Remember, all it needs is a shot of Freon!
The Vendo V-83 is the '59 Edsel of the coke machine world. ;p
Spray painting does NOT restore a compressor
Because 11 is louder than 10...
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